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How much do you have to travel for out-of-state probate?

On Behalf of | Aug 11, 2022 | Estate Planning

When your loved one passed away in Texas, one of your immediate concerns was how often you’d need to be there to handle the estate. You were happy to become the executor of their estate when they lived with you in Oklahoma, but you didn’t realize that they had kept you as the executor once they moved.

The frustrating thing about the out-of-state probate process is that you’ll have to stay in hotels, miss several days of work and spend a lot of money to take care of your loved one’s final needs. While you’re happy to do this for them, you still know that it is going to have a major impact on your life for the foreseeable future.

You’re in luck, because you can complete tasks remotely

Texas is unique compared to other states because you don’t necessarily need to come to the state to handle your loved one’s affairs. Even if you do, you may be able to schedule everything you need to do within a specific timeframe, so you’re able to come to Texas only when it’s reasonable for you to do so.

Due to changes in how the court works, judges are only meeting with attorneys and their clients via Zoom or video conferencing tools at the moment. That is fantastic news if you’re out of state but need to handle your loved one’s estate, since you can click to join the meeting from anywhere you are.

If you have to work through out-of-state probate, it can be beneficial to work with an attorney who is in Texas. While you might have some understanding of the laws in your own state, Texas has its own that will apply to your loved one’s estate. Your attorney can help you with several tasks, such as preparing to speak with the judge online and getting ready for a video conference.

While probating assets can be a challenge, the changes that have happened within the court system have made it easier for people in your kind of situation. You can look into video conferencing options, and they may make it so you never have to appear live in court.

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